100 GMO FREE Barletta Onion Seeds

100 Barletta Onion Seeds – GMO FREE – HEIRLOOM — OPEN-POLLINATED

I add onions to nearly every meal… raw and cooked.  And there’s no onion like an onion grown in your own yard.  The benefits are priceless… including you don’t have to leave your home, you know exactly what went into growing and you can’t beat the flavor of onions right out of the garden!

Not only are all parts of the plant delicious, it’s loaded with antioxidants and other nutrients, and it helps that it’s easy to grow, even in small spaces!

Barletta Onions are an Italian heirloom.  The black seeds produce small white onions, about ¾”.

 

These Barletta Onion seeds are:

* NON-GMO

* UNTREATED

* OPEN-POLLINATED

* HEIRLOOM

 

Get benefits, natural remedies, planting instructions and recipes on our site at GreenDesert.org

15 GMO Free Okra Seeds

There is a lot of discussion over the exact origin of the okra plant but many believe it began growing as early as the 12th century BC in Ethiopia.
Some people call it “lady’s finger.” And although most times you see okra it’s green, it actually comes in two colors — red and green. Both varieties taste the same, and the red one turns green when cooked.
Okra is actually a part of the mallow plant family which is the same family where marshmallows come from. It definitely seems like a strange relation, like please do not try making okra smores. But the stickiness and gooeyness of the okra comes from the mucilage mallow plants produce that are made up of sugar residues called exopolysaccharides and proteins called glycoproteins. When this is heated up you get that perfect consistency for a gumbo.

Besides a yummy flavor, okra has lots of nutritional benefits including lowering blood cholesterol levels and blood sugar, it’s also rich in antioxidants, Vitamins A, C and magnesium.
Okra is pretty easy to grow if you live in an area with a lot of sun. In fact, we can’t keep up with it in our yard. Once the plant matures, we literally have to harvest daily because the vegetables just keep coming. And once the okra gets too big, it’s tougher than most people like.

15 seeds for $5

All of our seeds are non-gmo, untreated and open-pollinated.

How to plant
A few special things to keep in mind when deciding to plant okra is to leave some space between okra plants, around 10 inches, if you’re gonna plant several.
Wait until chances of the last frost are gone before planting the seeds directly in your garden in a sunny spot. It loves heat, which is why it grows so well in Phoenix!
Plant the seeds about ¼ inch deep. They require around 1 inch of water per week and do survive in droughts but don’t make them suffer unnecessarily. In my garden, I plant my okra in the same bed with my peppers. They are great companion plants because they are not competing for nutrients. It also helps control pests. And even though the plants don’t need much water, it does fine on the same schedule of my peppers — typically once a day for about 20 minutes. But my favorite way of watering pretty much all of my veggies is using ollas. Ollas take the guesswork out of watering and can cut your water bill in half – YouTube]. The ollas take the guesswork out of watering because the plants take exactly what they need… so if it’s an option, I definitely recommend it.
Once the okra is about 2-3 inches long it’s time to harvest! That’s the best time. Waiting too long to harvest will give you hard and woody okra… not as pleasant to eat, although I’ve had them in my soups and beans and it was fine.

OKRA STIR FRY RECIPE
Below is a simple way I make my okra. Feel free to be creative, add more spices, veggies, etc.
I stir fry onions, bell peppers, shishito peppers, celery and garlic for a few minutes before adding my okra. I like to slice my okra, about a third inch thick. Next I add chopped tomatoes, society garlic and whatever other herbs I have in the garden to the pan. Finally season to your liking… I sprinkle a little lemon and add salt and pepper. Delish! Let me know if you try if or if you have any other recipes!

What about the slime?
If slime is not your jam, then there are a few tricks you can utilize to avoid a sticky situation:
• You can freeze the okra and then cut it while it is still frozen to get rid of almost all the slime.
• There is also the vinegar trick where you soak the okra in vinegar for at least 30 minutes and then pat dry before cooking.
• Some people even say cutting okra in bigger pieces or imagining that you’re cutting an onion helps avoid a lot of the mucilage too.
• I cut around the head of the stem, almost like you’re peeling a potato. So instead of just chopping off the stem, just trim it off. Got this tip from my mother-n-law and it totally takes away some of that sliminess.
Do you love the slime? If not, how do you get rid of it?

More benefits, natural remedies, planting instructions and recipes on our site at GreenDesert.org

25 GMO free Royal Burgundy Bush Bean Seeds

Heirloom Royal Burgundy Bush Bean Seeds, Non-GMO – Eat them raw or watch them turn colors while they cook

25 seeds

These beans look great anywhere you plant them!  The pods are a deep purple shade on the outside and a bright green shade on the inside.  Imagine how gorgeous they are when snapped.  It’s a stringless pod that you can eat straight off the plant.  If you prefer to cook them, expect the purple shade to turn green.  They are also great for freezing and canning and tend to be a bit sweeter than traditional green beans.

It’s a great bean to grow because it performs well in cooler and warmer planting zones.  And since it’s a bush bean, you won’t need to support it with a trellis.

The pods tend to grow about five inches in length with light brown seeds that you can save for planting.

You’ll want to wait until after the last frost has occurred to start planting.  The seeds will germinate once the soil temps have reached 65 degrees or higher.  Ideal temps for germination is around 77 degrees.  Expect the seeds to sprout within 2 weeks.

You can plant directly into the soil about one inch deep and three to four inches apart.  They do well in rows about 15 inches apart.  Plant every couple of weeks throughout the spring and early summer for a continuous harvest. Expect the plants to average at least 15 inches tall.

Harvest the pods at about five to six inches… 50-70 days.

All of our seeds are:

* NON-GMO

* UNTREATED

* OPEN POLLINATED

More benefits, natural remedies, planting instructions and recipes on our site at GreenDesert.org

 

 

25 Non-GMO Edamame BeSweet Seeds

Edamame BeSweet Soybean Seeds – Non-GMO, Heirloom, Open-pollinated

25 seeds

 

I love to snack on edamame beans… they’re simple to make, has a high amount of fiber and protein and they are so yummy.

It helps that they are easy to grow.

The plants grow in bushes up to three feet tall.

 

Two weeks after the last frost, sow the seeds about one inch deep.  I space my seeds about 5 inches apart in a sunny location.  If you have a lot of space, sow the seeds about 12 inches apart to allow each plant to get more sun.  That will get you higher yields because they thrive in the heat. The temperature should be between 50 and 85 degrees… 60 degrees is ideal for germination.  Water immediately after planting and keep the moist until the plants are established.  They should start sprouting in about a week.

You can pick the pods when they are plump and still green in color.  You can actually feel the beans in the pod.

 

All of our seeds are:

* NON-GMO

* UNTREATED

* OPEN POLLINATED

More benefits, natural remedies, planting instructions and recipes on our site at GreenDesert.org

 

 

50 GMO Free Organic Ruby Red Chard Seeds

50 Organic Ruby Red Chard Seeds — GMO Free, open-pollinated

 

50 ORGANIC RUBY RED CHARD SEEDS (Beta vulgaris)

  • GMO Free
  • Open-Pollinated

 

Swiss Chard is one of my favorite vegetables to grow for so many reasons.  Regardless of the variety, they are all gorgeous greens that are full of nutrition, and you can pretty much have them year-round.

In fact you can plant it in the spring, summer and fall.

We planted several varieties in September and the plant made it through the winter and even the Arizona heat, still thriving a year later!

This is a very flexible plant, not just with growing, but the whole plant is edible.

We eat the leaves raw in salads and also cook the leaves AND stalks.  I like to add onions and garlic, then stir fry the chard with a little lemon and white wine vinegar… it is simple and so yummy.  Balsamic vinegar is a good option if you don’t have white wine vinegar.

It’s also a great source of Vitamins A, C and K.

Did I mention it’s easy to grow?

You’ll get your best results with soil loose enough to drain and full sun.

You can start your seeds indoors if you’re trying to get the earliest harvest but planting directly in the soil works great too.

Plant two seeds about 1/2 inch deep and 6-12 inches apart. Then water them immediately.   You can also grow them in containers. The seeds should germinate in about a week. Keep in mind the plants can grow up to 2 feet tall.  We add a high nitrogen fertilizer about every two weeks. You can start harvesting as soon as six weeks, when the leaves are about six inches long.  We break off the outer leaves at the base so that the inner leaves will keep growing.  It’ll give you a longer harvest.

As for when to plant, if it’s part of your spring garden, get the seeds in the ground when there’s no more chance of frost.

If you grow in the winter, plant your seeds about a month before the first fall frost.

 

And if you companion plant, remember that all plants don’t get along.  Avoid planting chard near cucumbers, melons and corn.  They tend to compete for soil nutrients… which makes it more likely to get infested with pests.  It’s the same for members of its family, like spinach and beets.  All of these crops attract the same pests.

 

All of our seeds are:

* NON-GMO

* UNTREATED

* OPEN POLLINATED

More benefits, natural remedies, planting instructions and recipes on our site at GreenDesert.org

Edamame BeSweet Soybean Seeds – Non-GMO, Heirloom, Open-pollinated

Edamame BeSweet Soybean Seeds – Non-GMO, Heirloom, Open-pollinated

25 seeds

 

I love to snack on edamame beans… they’re simple to make, has a high amount of fiber and protein and they are so yummy.

It helps that they are easy to grow.

The plants grow in bushes up to three feet tall.

 

Two weeks after the last frost, sow the seeds about one inch deep.  I space my seeds about 5 inches apart in a sunny location.  If you have a lot of space, sow the seeds about 12 inches apart to allow each plant to get more sun.  That will get you higher yields because they thrive in the heat. The temperature should be between 50 and 85 degrees… 60 degrees is ideal for germination.  Water immediately after planting and keep the moist until the plants are established.  They should start sprouting in about a week.

You can pick the pods when they are plump and still green in color.  You can actually feel the beans in the pod.

 

All of our seeds are:

* NON-GMO

* UNTREATED

* OPEN POLLINATED

More benefits, natural remedies, planting instructions and recipes on our site at GreenDesert.org

GMO Free 40 Purple Lady Bok Choy seeds

40 Purple Lady Bok Choy seeds for $5

 

This Purple Lady Bok Choy is filled with high levels of antioxidants.  This variety is also loaded with vitamin A… about three times as much as the green variety and it’s so yummy.

Plus it’s easy to grow.

 

 

All of our seeds are:

* NON-GMO

* UNTREATED

* OPEN POLLINATED

 

Get benefits, natural remedies, planting instructions and recipes on our site at GreenDesert.org

GMO Free Armenian Cucumbers seeds

WHY ARMENIAN CUCUMBERS ARE UNDER-RATED

 

There are so many types of cucumbers…  everything from English, Persian, lemon and one of my favorites – Armenian cucumbers. They’re also known as yard-long melons, which makes sense when looking at its appearance.

The fruit grows about 30 to 36 inches… but it’s most flavorful at about 15 inches.  The inside of the cucumber resembles more of a cantaloupe than a cucumber.  And not only are they crisp and refreshing, they are great hydrators.  In fact I think they are under rated for their health benefits.

Since they consist mostly of water and electrolytes, they can relieve dehydration, which is also great at helping prevent constipation.  The high water content is also a bonus if you’re trying to lose weight… along with its low calories.

One of the things we do on hikes is we pack hydrating fruits and veggies… like cucumbers and oranges.  We snack on them throughout the hike, with small sips of water.  This hydrates our bodies and keeps me from having to go to the bathroom more often from drinking so much water.

Did you know that some people get as much as 40% of their total water intake from food.

I use Armenian cucumbers for my pickles and relish.  I add them to sandwiches, wraps, salads, water or just snack on them raw.  There are so many ways to enjoy any type of cucumber, but Armenian cucumbers are still one of my preferences.

They are refreshing and have so many health benefits including being high in antioxidants, a range of B vitamins, along with vitamins A and K.  And don’t toss the peel, eat it all because that’s where you’ll get your maximum nutrients… benefits that also extend to your skin.  Remember when I mentioned the high water content in cucumbers? That makes it great for reducing skin irritations and helping with aging.  The old sliced cucumber over your puffy eyes work for a reason. The high water content hydrates the skin around your eyes while the antioxidants and flavonoids in the cucumbers reduce swelling and soothes inflammation in the eye area.

All you have to do is slice two pieces of  a cool cucumber from the fridge.  Close your eyes and place the slices on them for about 15 minutes.  Then just pat your eyes dry when you’re done.  Try this routine morning and night and watch the puffiness melt away.

According to the USDA, one 142-g cup of unpeeled, raw, chopped cucumber contains the following nutrients:

  • water: 137 g
  • calories: 17
  • protein: 0.8 g
  • fat: 0.2 g
  • carbohydrate: 3.1 g, including 2.0 g of sugar
  • fiber: 1.0 g
  • calcium: 19.9 g
  • iron: 0.3 mg
  • magnesium: 17 mg
  • phosphorus: 29.8 mg
  • potassium: 193 mg
  • sodium: 2.8 mg
  • vitamin C: 4.5 mg
  • folate: 19.9 mcg
  • beta carotene: 44 mcg
  • lutein + zeaxanthin 22.7 mcg
  • vitamin K: 10.2 mcg

 

Unfortunately you don’t often see Armenian cucumbers at local grocery stores.  You’re more likely to find them in farmers markets.  Another option — GROW THEM!  They’re pretty easy to grow.  In fact they thrive in hot summers, great for us in Phoenix.  The high temperatures do not stress them.

We sell our seeds in our Etsy shop!

All of our seeds are NON-GMO, untreated and open-pollinated.

 

 

HOW TO GROW:

The two main ingredients for a high yield of Armenian cucumbers are hot days and lots of water.

The best time to plant is after the last chance of frost. The ideal temperature range for germinating the seeds is between 65 and 90 degrees.  The warmer temps will yield faster sprouts, in as little as three days.

Once the temperature is right, decide how many plants you can handle.  They love to vine and can easily take over a garden… and you can continue planting through the heat.  Just a few plants will give you almost more than you can handle.

Now it’s time to plant!  I make a hole with my finger about a half inch deep, with about a foot in between each plant.  Then I place two to three seeds in each hole.  Next I sprinkle soil to fill the holes and cover the area.  Then I water the area with a light shower immediately.

Remember, try not to overcrowd the plants because that makes them more susceptible to pests and diseases.

It’s best to pick the plants once they’re about a foot and a half.  Although they can grow over three feet long, and are still fine to eat, they don’t taste as good.  Also, leaving the fruit on the vine for long periods tells the plant it no longer needs to produce, so you will slow down your production.

Finally, when you’re harvesting your fruit, I like to cut it from the vine versus pulling it, to make sure I don’t damage the whole vine.

 

More benefits and other natural remedies at GreenDesert.org.

GMO Free Arugula Seeds

ARUGULA seeds! Did you know arugula is used as an aphrodisiac?

Open-pollinated, GMO FREE, heirloom seeds

Did you know that arugula has been used as an aphrodisiac since the first century? Apparently it has something to do with the antioxidants and minerals that you find in the leafy greens. They help block environmental contaminants which are thought to be negative to our libido.

It’s also rich in other nutrients including vitamins A, C and E, zinc and folic acids.  It also has antioxidant properties, along with calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium.

It’s a leafy green that adds a peppery zest to just about anything.  I compare it to a wasabi… others describe it as spicy, mustardy, even peppery.  Either way, it adds excitement to your life – to your food AND the bedroom.

It is yummy raw but just as good steamed.

I add it to my salads, sandwiches, soups, beans, eggs – anything I want to add the extra spice to.

If you are thinking of adding this invigorating vegetable to your garden, let me warn you… it is very high yielding.  Arugala pops up all over my yard every year… in places I never thought of planting, so it re-seeds each season.

We sell our seeds on our Etsy site… 50 seeds for $5.

All of our seeds are GMO Free, open-pollinated and untreated.

DIRECT SEEDING:
Sow 1/8″ deep at 3 seeds/inch in rows at least 1″ apart from early spring onward.

 

GMO Free Basil Seeds

BASIL CAN SPICE UP YOUR MEALS AND HEALTH

 

Basil is a staple in the kitchen because it’s so flavorful it can spice up almost any meal – from pasta and bruschetta to pizza and salads.

Now you can eat it with pride because it’s got some pretty good medicinal benefits too.

I’m specifically referring to Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum), as opposed to tulsi or Holy Basil (Ocimum santum).

Sweet Basil has many varieties including Genovese basil, Thai basil, and Lemon basil.

I have a pesto recipe at the end of this blog but before you start making it, let’s talk some benefits.  You’ll get the most nutrition from eating basil raw.

 

BENEFITS

Basil is an excellent source of vitamins K, A, C, manganese and iron.  It’s also a good source of magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids and magnesium.  Even more, it’s full of flavonoids, known to protect your cells from oxidative damage; it’s a powerful antioxidant, and can help fight inflammation in the body.

 

Knowing that it has all of those nutrients, it’s no surprise that it’s used to treat all sorts of ailments including digestion issues, headaches and migraines, liver problems, it’s even used to treat wounds.

Look at the ingredients on some of your natural beauty products.  You may see basil there!

 

 

HOW TO GROW

 

If you’ve grown the herb, you probably won’t be surprised that it’s a member of the mint family.  It can take over a garden bed before you know it.  So of course I recommend adding it to your yard.

 

Regardless of the type of basil you choose to grow, the instructions are pretty much the same.

I will talk specifically to Genovese basil because that’s one of the herbs I consistently grow and sell in our Etsy Shop (add shop link).  It’s one of the sweetest varieties and it re-seeds itself!

 

You can grow it in pots or directly in the ground; just give it a little space.  Genovese basil plants can grow up to 3 feet high but you can trim the plant to keep it smaller, especially if you’re growing in smaller areas, like a sunny window.

You’ll want to plant outdoor once temperatures are consistently at least 70 degrees, when all danger of frost is gone.  If you plant indoor, sow your seeds about 5 weeks before the last expected frost.

They like moist (not wet), well-draining soil and full sun, at least six hours of sunlight per day.  They are not fans of cold droughts.

I scatter my seeds over damp soil, then sprinkle soil on top because they don’t’ need to be planted deep.  They should germinate within a week and once your plant is mature, it’s really easy to care for.  You won’t need to fertilize because it isn’t a heavy feeder and you can pick your leaves until it gets cold.

Keep in mind that once your plants start producing flowers, which is where you will find your seeds for the next season, they tend to stop producing new leaves.

 

We have tons of other GMO-Free, open-pollinated seeds that I harvest myself in our Etsy shop (add Etsy link), so check it out!

 

We also have an entire page of natural remedies (add remedies link), so check that our for any ailments you may be experiencing.

 

 

PESTO RECIPE

 

3 cups of chopped basil

½ cup nuts (toasted pine nuts recommended, almonds cheaper and work great)

½ cup oil

3 tablespoons of garlic

2/3 cups parmesan cheese

½ teaspoon of chili powder

3 tablespoons of lemon (optional—keeps pesto from turning brownish)

 

Put basil in your blender or food processor, add one tablespoon of oil and blend into a paste.  Add more oil as needed to make it smooth.  Add the rest of your ingredients and continue to blend.  That’s it!

It’s delish as-is but some people add parsley, garlic, salt and whatever else adds the flavor you’re looking for.

Either way, it’s a yummy addition to all sorts of meals and it’s a simple way to use the basil fresh for the best nutrition.

And you don’t have to use it all at once because it’s easy to store.  I freeze mine in ice cubes trays and keep the cubes in baggies in the freezer.

 

Here’s a video making the recipe:

GMO Free Black-Eyed Cowpeas Seeds

Black-Eyed Cowpeas, also known as a “Southern Field Pea” or “Crowder Pea are one of my favorite legumes to grow because you get sooooo many and there are multiple ways to eat them.

One way is to let the beans dry and cook them… your traditional black-eyed peas.   For this method it’ll take anywhere between 80 – 100 days til harvesting time… and you have options; You can let the pods stay on the plant until they are brown and dry, or you can pull the plants and hang them to dry.  Either way, I usually leave a few plants in the garden beds to dry so that I have an abundance of seeds for planting and sharing.

If you choose to dry them for cooking that traditional black-eyed peas dish, you will simply remove the beans from the pods (shell them), and you’re ready!  I don’t do anything special with cleaning… but I do soak all of my beans for at least 6 hours before cooking them.

You can also pick the pods while they are green, like a snap pea,  as soon as they are well-filled out with seeds, about 70 days after planting.  For this method, I chop the pods and add onions, bell peppers and whatever else I have in the garden.  So you can really get creative.

The pods are 6″ to 8” long  and can have up to 15 peas on each one.  That’s a lot of beans! And the vines are resistant to wilt and nematodes. They are cream or tannish-colored with a small black spot. They love heat and are a great source of fiber and protein.

So how do you plant them?

I plant my seeds directly into my garden beds with lots of compost.  But many experts suggest you first soak the seeds for up to 12 hours.  The idea is that since the seeds like a lot of moisture in order to germinate, this will speed up the process because they will already be soft and moist. Then plant them directly in the soil, after your last chance of frost (ideally above 70 degrees.  You don’t need to plant them deep, about an inch into the soil.  They are heavy yielders, so give them some space.  I plant the seeds about three inches apart and I space the rows about two feet apart.   Also it’s best to give them some support, like trellises.  It helps keep the plants off the ground, which gives them more circulation and it should minimize disease.  It also makes it easier to harvest.

As for when you will see your babies popping out of the soil… My experience has been within a week, but other gardeners say 7-14 days.  So be patient.

20+ seeds for $5

All of our seeds are GMO-FREE, open-pollinated and untreated.

 

 

GMO Free Cantaloupe Melon Seeds

Sweet and Juicy Hales Best Cantaloupe melon seeds – GMO FREE — Heirloom

25 seeds for $5

All of our seeds are NON-GMO, untreated and open-pollinated.

 

These Hales Best cantaloupe seeds are soooo juicy and sweet… they are addicting!

It’s a summer crop that thrives in full sun… even in the dead summer heat in Phoenix.

The fruit is easy to grow and keeps on giving.

 

HOW TO PLANT

Choose a spot with lots of sun, at least 6 hours per day, and keep in mind cantaloupe likes space.

I plant two seeds in well-draining soil with lots of compost about a1/2 inch deep with the pointed part of the seed directed down to promote root growth, and I space them about 3 feet apart.

They germinate best if the soil is above 70 degrees Fahrenheit and the seeds tend to sprout within a week!

Water the seeds immediately after planting and frequently.  We fertilize our plants every 2 to 3 weeks.

They will be ready to harvest in about 90 days.

 

More benefits and other natural remedies at GreenDesert.org

GMO Free Crimson Sweet Picnic Watermelon seeds

Crimson Sweet Picnic Watermelon seeds

25 seeds for $5

All of our seeds are NON-GMO, untreated and open-pollinated.

 

If you haven’t had Crimson Sweet Picnic watermelons, you are missing out!

They call them picnic watermelons because they’re huuuuge… perfect size for picnics and sweet like candy.  Our average watermelon this season grew one to two feet long.

And I don’t know about you, but the seeds are a must…  Makes me feel like it’s the watermelon from my childhood.  Mom would cut huge slices of watermelon and send us outside to enjoy it and we could be as messy as we wanted.  Those were the days… we’d spit the seeds out in the yard.  No surprise when we would see watermelon growing.

These days I give the seeds to the chickens and they luuuuuuv them.

Like I said, often the watermelon would grow from the seeds we spit out in the yard, so that tells you how easy the melons are to grow.

 

HOW TO PLANT

Choose a spot with lots of sun, at least 6 hours per day, and keep in mind watermelon needs lots of space to grow.  The vines can spread up to 10 feet long and they have deep roots.  I plant two seeds in well-draining soil with lots of compost about an inch deep, and I space them about 3 feet apart.  Some people give them up to 6 feet of space.

They germinate best in 70 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit and the seeds tend to sprout within a week!

Water the seeds immediately after planting and frequently.  We fertilize our plants every 2 to 3 weeks.

They will be ready to harvest in about 85 days.

 

More benefits and other natural remedies at GreenDesert.org.