How much do I save by growing my own food???

I'm often asked how much I save from growing some of my own food and medicine.  To me it's not about what I save but what I gain by doing it.  I see it as not having any other choice because my goal is to eat the best, purest, most fresh, organic foods.  So these calculations are based on what it would cost to buy top-quality foods.

 


At least three times per week, I try to eat a full meal of salad twice a day (lunch and dinner,  including a protein like egg whites, edamame beans, and on occasion fish…  all of which I produce in my yard). 


So let’s break down the cost: There are four members in my household.  If I were to buy identical meals from stores like Whole Foods or Fry’s Food, it would roughly cost me $4 per complete salad meal, per person.  Since the kids don’t eat as much as I, we will have them split a salad.  So in a week I'd save $72 per week or $288 per month by eating what I grow… and that’s just for the salad.


We also have tilapia once per month that we raise in our back yard.  I priced similar, organic, freshwater tilapia and we would pay about $10 per pound.  That adds another $30 of savings per month.
Next on the list are fresh eggs.  Our chickens lay roughly 21 eggs per week but we average about a dozen per week.  This adds up to $20 per month for the amount of eggs we eat.


Lastly there are miscellaneous savings in the form of water and energy conservation, fertilizer and fruit & herb production throughout the year.  This amounts to about $70 per month, bringing my total savings to $408 per month. 

 

Complete meals from fresh greens and salads per month $288
Tilapia $30
Eggs $20
Misc Savings: water, energy, fertilizer, fruits, herbs $70
Total $408

That’s a big chunk of change!  Of course the actual savings is much higher if you consider the health benefits.   By eating this way I pay less for medication, doctor visits, the gas to get to those appointments, and we can’t forget avoiding the mental anguish and stress that comes with thinking about my health and its decline.


Bottom-line, the best foods will often cost you more at the grocery store.  For example, you can find a dozen eggs on sale for a buck, so most people won’t consider $4 to $5 a dozen for healthier eggs.  You buy what fits your budget.  But I know that the better you eat, the better it is for your body, mind and soul.  So instead of breaking the bank, I produce as much food as I can on my own.  This way I can afford the benefits of eating healthier.


If you are looking for the cheapest foods and you are not concerned about your health, then this lifestyle is not for you.  But if your priority is enjoying life to its fullest, you may want to consider growing your own food and medicine. 

-Amirah GreenDesert Affiliate

 

Foods fromt the garden